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Xenozoid Xenozoid 14 janvier 18:03

Mazdakism, dualistic religion that rose to prominence in the late 5th century in Iran from obscure origins. According to some scholars, Mazdakism was a reform movement seeking an optimistic interpretation of the Manichaean dualism. Its founder appears to have been one Zaradust-e Khuragan ; a connection has been sought between him and a Persian, Bundos, who preached a divergent Manichaeism in Rome under Diocletian at the end of the 3rd century. Other scholars see it as an internal development within Iranian religion. After the 5th century the religion came generally to be called after Mazdak (fl. late 5th century AD, Persia), its major Persian proponent. No Mazdakite books survive. Knowledge of the movement comes from brief mentions in Syrian, Persian, Arabic, and Greek sources.

According to Mazdakism, there exist two original principles, Good (or Light) and Evil (or Darkness). Light acts by free will and design ; Darkness, blindly and by chance. By accident the two became mixed, producing the world. There are three Light elements : water, fire, and earth. The god of Light, who is to be worshiped, is enthroned in paradise, having before him four powers—perception, intelligence, memory, and joy. These rule over 7 “viziers” and 12 “spiritual beings”—identical with the 7 planets of antiquity and the 12 signs of the zodiac. The 4 powers are united in man ; the 7 and 12 control the world.

By his actions man should seek to release the Light in the world ; this is accomplished through moral conduct and ascetic life. He may not kill or eat flesh. He is to be gentle, kind, hospitable, and clement to foes. To encourage brotherly helpfulness and reduce causes of greed and strife, Mazdak sought to make property and women common. He converted to his faith the Sāsānid king Kavadh I (488–496 and 499–531), who introduced social reforms inspired by its tenets. These appear to have involved some liberalizing of marriage laws and of measures concerning property. These actions aroused the hostility of the nobles and the orthodox Zoroastrian clergy and led to the eventual suppression of Mazdakism. Nevertheless, the religion survived in secret into Islāmic times (the 8th century).


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